80s Song of the Day: Summer of ’69 by Bryan Adams

Oh and when you held my hand
I knew that it was now or never
Those were the best days of my life

summer 2Summer of ’69 by Bryan Adams was released on June 17, 1985, with The Best Was Yet To Come as the B side. It was the fourth single from the album Reckless.

The song reached No. 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and No. 11 in Adams’ native Canada. It peaked at No. 42 on the UK Singles Chart.

Watch the music video for the song.

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80s Song of the Day: Never Say Goodbye by Bon Jovi

Remember how we used to talk
About busting out, we’d break their hearts
Together, forever

never say goodbyeNever Say Goodbye by Bon Jovi was released June 15, 1987, with a live version of Shot Through the Heart as the B side. The song was a track off of the band’s album Slippery When Wet.

The song was never released as a single in the United States and, therefore, was ineligible for the Billboard Hot 100. It reached No. 21 on the UK Singles Chart.

Watch the music video for the song.

80s Song of the Day: Our Lips Are Sealed by The Go-Go’s

Can you hear them
They talk about us
Telling lies
Well that’s no surprise

our lips are sealedOur Lips Are Sealed by The Go-Go’s was released June 12, 1981, with Surfing and Spying as the B side. It was the first single from the band’s debut album, Beauty and the Beat.

The song reached No. 20 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 47 on the UK Singles chart. It was a Top 5 hit in Australia and Canada.

Watch the official music video for the song.

80s Song of the Day: Rock the Casbah by The Clash

By order of the prophet
We ban that boogie sound
Degenerate the faithful
With that crazy Casbah sound

rock the casbahRock the Casbah by The Clash was released on June 11, 1982, with Long Time Jerk as the B side. It was the third single released from the album Combat Rock.

The song reached No. 8 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart (The Clash’s only Top 10 hit in the U.S.) and No. 30 on the UK Singles Chart.

Watch the music video for the song.

 

80s Song of the Day: Who Can It Be Now? by Men at Work

If he hears, he’ll knock all day
I’ll be trapped and here I’ll have to stay

Who can it be nowWho Can It Be Now? by Men at Work was released in Australia on June 6, 1981, with Anyone for Tennis? as the B side. The song was released prior to the recording of the band’s debut album, Business as Usual. It was later included on the album.

The song reached No. 2 on the Australian singles chart. In the United States, it went all the way to No. 1 when it was released there more than a year after its Australian release. It had mixed reception elsewhere, only reaching No. 45 in the United Kingdom and in New Zealand.

Watch the music video for the song.

80s Song of the Day: Shout by Tears for Fears

Come on
I’m talking to you
Come on

ShoutShout by Tears for Fears was released in the United States on June 4, 1985, with The Big Chair as the B side. It was the second single released from the album Songs from the Big Chair.

Shout was a No.1 hit for Tears for Fears in the United States. It reached No. 4 on the UK Singles Chart. An international success, it was a Top 10 hit in more than 20 other countries.

Watch the official music video for the song.

80s Song of the Day: I Want Your Sex by George Michael

There’s things that you guess
And things that you know
There’s boys that you can trust
And girls that you don’t

I want yourI Want Your Sex by George Michael was released on June 1, 1987. The song consisted of three separate parts called Rhythms. The first, titled Rhythm One: Lust, was the version released as a single from the Beverly Hills Cop II soundtrack.

The first version mixed with the second version, Rhythm Two: Brass in Love, appeared on George Michael’s debut solo album Faith. The second version also appeared by itself as the B side of the single.

A third part, Rhythm Three: A Last Request, appeared as a B side to the Hard Day 7″ and Kissing a Fool 12″ singles, and as a bonus track on the CD version of Faith. All three versions were mixed continuously as one 13-minute song for the 12″ single release.

The controversial song reached No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and No. 3 on the UK Singles Chart.

Watch the music video for the song.